How to make your Windows PC fast as fuсk

ssd-benchmark-thingies-2

Last updated 11th of November 2016, including reducing the massively oversized quotation boxes on widescreens.

You may have noticed that your Windows PC is taking its sweet time to do things. Perhaps it takes a second to detect new screens, it may delay its booting, or it takes a split-second for windows and menus to fade in. Most of this is done for stylistic reasons, as almost everyone’s Windows PCs will stop up for a moment to show you its elegance. This is even the case for PCs with state-of-the-art components and hard disks.

But there are many ways to make it less sassy and flirting, and instead make it go straight to work at speeds that even Sonic the Hedgehog would be made speechless by.

The guide covers:
#1 Buy an SSD disk, but in the right way
#2 (If you have an SSD) Double-check if you could need a byte start adjustment
#3 Turn off fading animations in Windows
#4 See if your BIOS settings are correct
#5 Changing speed settings in the Windows Registry
#6 Ensure 1Gb/s speeds throughout your house’s networking chain
#7 Use 64-bit programs
#8 Buy a faster monitor. Or, alternately…
#9 (Windows 10 only) Use a PIN code for your Microsoft account
#10 Turn off startup programs that you don’t immediately need after starting up
#11 Don’t have a DVD in your disc reader while booting
#12 Don’t let your mechanical harddisks constantly go to sleep
#X1 A summary of things you shouldn’t do to increase speed

#1 Buy an SSD disk, but in the right way

You have probably heard all about it by now. They say that you must invest in what is essentially a giant-sized USB drive, whose €/GB is 3 times higher than with the old spinning whirl machines that you have used to store all your movies and games with for all those years.

And they’re perfectly right. You should. But there are some details about SSDs that the shopkeepers don’t tell you, and which the harddisk manufacturers may not always be open about.

Incompressable data transfering.

When hardware shops list their SSD’s abilities, they measure it in megabytes. On one hand, it’s a lot more applicable to real life than megabits, which is still what network equipment is advertised with. On the other hand, the hardware shop listings usually only apply to compressable data transfering.

Almost all SSD harddisks use compression schemes to make file transfering, writing, and reading go faster. Moreover, many SSD disks are poorly set up for reading and writing from random parts of the disk; as contrasted to “sequential reading”, where the data that is to be read/written is contained as one straight block on the disk.

As a rule of thumb, ‘compressable’ refers to how fast it can boot an OS or run most videogames. ‘Incompressable’ refers to simple media, such as images and music. In general, it comes down to how well the SSD can internally compress the files that are to be transfered/read/written.

If you have a particular harddisk in mind, you can look up benchmarks of it on Google, preferably ones that use CrystalDiskMark5. This is because that particular benchmark almost entirely test by using incompressable data as well as random writing. If you already have an SSD, you can download that tool from their project hosts at OSDN and see how much your harddisk producer has cheated you out on this. It’s only a matter of 0-2MB if you use the 32-bit or 64-bit version of the tool, but I will recommend the 64-bit version on pure principle.

The closer all the scales in the benchmark are to the hardware stores’ advertised speeds, the better. If the SSD can only muster ~100MB in writes in that test, or 80MB in 4KB reads, then you have in essence got less than you paid for, and/or should look out for models that score better in these regards.

ssd-benchmark-thingies-2
If you get something like this, then you didn’t get what you paid for.

#2 (If you have an SSD) Double-check if you could need a byte start adjustment

This solution should normally only come into play if you transfered your Windows installation from a spin-disk to an SSD disk without having formatted Windows. It couldn’t hurt double-checking still, however.

If you go to ‘System Information’, you should see a line there that says “Partition Starting Offset”, followed by a somewhat high number. The thing is that the number there should be dividable by 4096, because of how SSD storage blocks work.

Like this. (Source: How-To Geek)

So get out your calculator and start dividing. If it’s divisible, then everything is as it should be in this area, and you can skip down to #3. If it isn’t, then you’ll need to apply some extra energy to this.

Since Windows Disk Manager lack the ability to re-align the starting offset on its own, you’ll most likely need to download MiniTool Partition Wizard 9.1’s free version. Once you’ve done so, you can start the program, find your SSD disk there on its list, and click on “Align”. A while later, it should be divisible by 4096 again! 

#3 Turn off fading animations in Windows

Now this is where your Windows system has been the most sassy and sensual in the past 10 years. As the default on virtually all Windows installations (except if your PC is just barely above minimum specs), Windows will fade in the windows and menus that it’s loading in, and fade them out when exiting them. This amounts to 50-500 milliseconds in each and every one of the instance where it happens.

If you feel you have the reflexes and familiarity with Windows that you can cope with the rocket speeds you’re about to experience, head to Control Panel → System & Security → System → Advanced System Settings → Performance [Settings].

Once you’re there, turn off the following checkboxes:

[] Animations in the taskbar
[] Fade or slide menus into view
[] Fade or slide ToolTips into view
[] Animate controls and elements inside windows
[] Fade out menu itemsafter clicking
[] Smooth-scroll in list boxes
[] Slide open combo boxes
[] Animate windows when minimising or maximising

visual-performance-thingies
In this example, I’ve only activated the very most needed style factors, turning off everything else.

And if you see anything else there about animation, fading, or sliding, turn off them too.

Click on “Apply”, and you’ll see a huge immediate change. “Whoooah”, you’re thinking, “it’s so fast to browse around in the system now that I can barely keep up with it.”

#4 See if your BIOS settings are correct

Now this is where it gets finicky. Everything you will see in #4 will be subjective and will require trial and error to fit in with your machine.

This guide relies on the modern UEFI-BIOS, since it carries exclusive features that are rare on non-UEFI motherboards.

Go into the UEFI-BIOS of your computer, and see if you can find any of the following features. Any tips to what you should set it to, need to be taken with a grain of salt and some personal exploration on your end.

•Fast Boot (set it to “Enable”)
•Hardware Fast Boot (set it to “Enable”)
•Next Boot After AC Loss (set it to “Fast Boot”)
•Post Screen Delay (set it to 0 or 1 seconds)
•Fast Boot → Initialize SATA (see if you can set it to “Hard Drives Only” and still be able to boot)
•Fast Boot → Initialize PS/2 (set it to “Disable” unless you have a very exclusive mechanical keyboard with a round plug)
•Fast Boot → Initialize USB (Conversely, if you have a PS/2 keyboard, you can turn off USB usage on the boot screen instead. But only then.)
•iGPU mode (set it to “Enable”. This permits you to use both motherboard and screen card screens simultaneously at their full strengths.)
•SATA mode (Double-check that it isn’t set to IDE. It is normally better to have it set to AHCI; however, changing this after having already installed Windows, can lead to problems booting it.)
•PCIe lane modes (If it’s set to Gen1 or Gen2, instead of Auto, then you may need to change the affected PCIe lanes back to Auto. Auto should normally also cover Gen3 on recent motherboards, making it a safe bet.)

After you’ve changed the configuration, save and reboot. If everything went fine, then you’ll boot as normal. The first time you’ve booted after making the changes can be a tad slow however, so feel free to reboot again a minute or so after you’ve returned to the desktop screen again. But if you’ve completely nailed the configuration, you may just be able to cut the startup time of your PC by half.

If your system fail to boot after this, you’ll need to head back into the BIOS, which can at worst take several booting attempts to get to, and furthermore change or revert the settings that you changed the first time around.

Be also aware that most BIOS firmware upgrades will revert the settings to their defaults, meaning that you’ll need to fine-tune these settings again.

#5 Changing speed settings in the Windows Registry

You may think a lot of things about this. All the Windows geek sites have told you to never fiddle with the Windows Registry without knowing what you’re doing, or else you’d go to bed without supper.

But it’s much less dangerous if you 1) have guides on what you’re supposed to change, and 2) are able to follow mathematically objective cooking recipes. And here on Sprout’s Lucky Corner, we’ll help you with both of these!

Go to Windows Notepad, paste the cursive text below into it, do any needed adjustments, save the file as a .reg, and then click on the .reg once you’re comfortable with the values.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\16.0\Excel\Options]
“DisableSaveAsLossWarningOpenDocumentSpreadsheet”=dword:1

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4D36E968-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}\000?]
“EnableRGBFullRange”=dword:1
“DeepColorHDMIDisable”=dword:0
“DelayedDetectionForHDMI”=dword:190

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Control\Class\{4D36E968-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}\000?]
“EnableRGBFullRange”=dword:1
“DeepColorHDMIDisable”=dword:0
“DelayedDetectionForHDMI”=dword:190

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4D36E968-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}\000?]
“SetDefaultFullRGBRangeOnHDMI”=dword:1

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Control\Class\{4D36E968-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}\000?]
“SetDefaultFullRGBRangeOnHDMI”=dword:1

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Nvidia Corporation\Global\NVTweak]
“NvCplAllowStartupDelay”=dword:400

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop]
“JPEGImportQuality”=dword:100

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FileSystem]
“LongPathsEnabled”=dword:1

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Cloud Content]
“DisableWindowsConsumerFeatures”=dword:1

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Serialize]
“StartupDelayInMSec”=dword:0

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced]
“ExtendedUIHoverTime”=dword:135

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop]
“MenuShowDelay”=”200”

The red question marks up there, is the biggest obstacle that prevents you from pasting and using this verbatim. The display drivers on Windows may be installed in random order, so Intel’s and Nvidia’s drivers can be either \0000, \0001, or maybe even \0002. You need to look into the registry yourself to see where the drivers are placed. You could try to add the Intel and Nvidia entries to both \0000 and \0001 to make it easier to use on multiple computers, but I refuse to hold any responsibility if anything weird occurs if you try that particular option.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: “Why would I trust a random grumpy blog guy with having my best intentions, or to let him change seemingly random values in the spooky registry?”

Almost all of the values can be cross-checked if you’re good at Googling, and I will present an explanation of each and every one of them below. 

Now to what the values actually do (Each description is for the value above it, and not the one below it):

“DisableSaveAsLossWarningOpenDocumentSpreadsheet”=dword:1

Forces Microsoft Excel to not taunt you with warning messages each and every time you save an .ods spreadsheet. 1 = apply the string’s effect, 0 = don’t apply the string’s effect.

“EnableRGBFullRange”=dword:1
“DeepColorHDMIDisable”=dword:0

These should normally force Intel integrated graphics to use the full 0-255 RGB scale. A very shameful thing about many technical products, is that they don’t use the full scale by standard, but instead uses an older 16-240 scale that makes the white and black colors weaker. Since almost all TVs and monitors made within the past 5-15 years support the full scale, it’s time to turn it on. 1 = apply the string’s effect, 0 = don’t apply the string’s effect.

“DelayedDetectionForHDMI”=dword:190

This determine how long time it takes before Intel integrated graphics decide to acknowledge that an HDMI plug has been connected to it. The standard value is written in hexadecimal, with a decimal value of 1000, meaning it takes 1000ms (1.0 second!) to detect it. By changing the hex value to 190, which means 400 in decimal, we can make it somewhat faster each time you need to plug in a TV or two.

“SetDefaultFullRGBRangeOnHDMI”=dword:1

Force-enables the full 0-255 RGB range on Nvidia graphics cards/solutions. 1 = enable, 0 = disable.

“NvCplAllowStartupDelay”=dword:400

Determines how long it takes from reaching desktop, to Nvidia’s own Control Panel deciding to start up in the background. Value determines the amount of milliseconds that it will wait. Default value is 500.

“JPEGImportQuality”=dword:100

Tells Windows 10 to stop compressing your desktop’s background pictures. The value can be set between 60 and 100; the higher it is, the more of the original image’s quality is retained.

“LongPathsEnabled”=dword:1

Allows Windows 10 Anniversary Edition to read, write and use filenames that are longer than 260 characters. 1 = enable, 0 = disable.

“DisableWindowsConsumerFeatures”=dword:1

Tells Windows 10 to very dearly shut up about the app advertisements that it can place on both your Start Menu and your Lock Screen. 1 = turn the ads off, 0 = turn them back on again.

“StartupDelayInMSec”=dword:0

Another sassy thing about Windows, is that it can delay the desktop boot of your PC in order to be 102% certain to load all the major features first. But if your PC is not slow as a snail, you can reduce the value to 0 milliseconds, so as to boot faster. If you don’t have an SSD disk, you may or may not want to have it somewhat higher than 0. Value determines how many milliseconds it will wait.

“ExtendedUIHoverTime”=dword:135

This chooses how long time it will take between your mouse heading down to the Windows toolbar, and the window/tab previews showing up. Normally it’s somewhere around 200ms. While you can set it to 1ms (but seemingly not 0ms), this would carry a trade-off in that it becomes somewhat more difficult to reach the desktop .exes that are placed near the toolbar. Value determines how many milliseconds it will wait.

“MenuShowDelay”=”200”

This one determines how long it will take from you hover over an area in a menu (be it in the system menus or in a program), until its related submenu pops up. Default value is 400. You do not want to set it too low, since it will result in issues with the submenus popping up too quickly, leading to problems browsing around in some programs.


Of course, many of these are not related to speed, but they feel like nice bonuses that really shows what the Registry can do.

You can combine and mix the values above into your own reduced set if you want to. To do so, open Notepad, paste the lines you want to use, save it as a .reg, and use it. If you’re looking purely for speed on your Windows PC and nothing else, you can for example paste/edit/save the following:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.0

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4D36E968-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}\0000]
“DelayedDetectionForHDMI”=dword:190

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Control\Class\{4D36E968-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}\0000]
“DelayedDetectionForHDMI”=dword:190

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Nvidia Corporation\Global\NVTweak]
“NvCplAllowStartupDelay”=dword:400

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Serialize]
“StartupDelayInMSec”=dword:0

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced]
“ExtendedUIHoverTime”=dword:135

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop]
“MenuShowDelay”=”200”

You MUST include the relevant and EXACT filepaths to all the values you want to include, and you MUST have “Windows Registry Editor Version 5.0” as the first line.

If you’re feeling scared still, however, you can test them on your older laptop you barely use anymore. If your laptop survives and becomes fast as fuсk, then you can use your .reg file on your other PCs too.

#6 Ensure 1Gb/s speeds throughout your house’s networking chain

Do you have a home with puny internet speeds, fallouts, dropouts, and in general a lot of failures? This is very likely to be the result of your network equipment producers being lazy cheapwads, who think that selling their products with only 100Mb/s speeds is somehow still a good idea.

This is an area where you are very likely to need to shell out some money to fix it, depending on how many things you have in your house that have Ethernet ports in them. This is because that on your PC/console/TV’s road to the internet plug in the wall, it will be a giant bottleneck if even one part of the chain is limited to 100 megabits per second!

To check if you miraculously already have 1Gb/s throughout the chain, you can head to your Windows network card’s settings, check its Status, and see if the speed is listed as “1.0 Gbps”. If it’s listed as “100 Mbps”, or the even worse “10 Mbps”, then you really need to do some upgrades.

network-card-thingies
This is showing the good speed. Does your card show you the good speed or the bad speed?

You should also check the specifications and/or manuals of all connection points you have. You must do it with your router, switches, modem, powerplugs, access points, and wireless repeaters. All of them. If any of them say they have 100Mbps Ethernet ports, throw the offending scalliwags away and buy replacements for them.

Only after setting up / buying / assuring the free 1Gb/s flow throughout the whole chain, can you then breathe happily again. You will also see somewhat of an improvement in reliability even if your paid Internet subscription is maybe even as low as 50Mb/s.

#7 Use 64-bit programs

Arguably the least rocket-speedy of all the advices in this guide, is to install and use 64-bit programs whenever it is possible.

You won’t see any fireblazing change unless you deal with very heavy workloads in the programs in question, but programming experts do agree that they can more easily handle increasingly bigger computing processes, and that they support more complicated security measures.

There are some obstacles in the way, however. Many, many Windows programs, such as Firefox, VLC, and Microsoft Office, make it so that the biggest download buttons on their websites would install the 32-bit version of their programs, and not the 64-bit version. There are also many program makers (Hauppauge, CyberLink) that doesn’t even make 64-bit versions of their programs. You will therefore need to look around on their websites to get their 64-bit programs.

vlc-thingies
VLC trying to hide their 64-bit version as deep as they possibly can.

All this convolution is because many programs have built up a huge extension base over the course of more than a decade, and they have wanted to maintain end-user support for the extensions for as long as possible. If you however don’t have several dozen extensions crammed into your Firefox, then feel free to go for 64-bit programs in each and every possible instance.

#8 Buy a faster monitor. Or, alternately…

You may have seen people claim that your eyes can’t register more than some random amount of frames per second that they’ve just made up. While human eyes are peculiar things, the actual max amount would seem to be several hundred frames in practice. Because trust me, you will notice a giant difference if you buy a 120Hz PC monitor or higher. Even if you make the jump from 144Hz to, say, 180Hz, you’ll still notice a small improvement.

Of course you need to figure out which output sockets your monitor will support in order to get the advertised amount of hertz (DisplayPort always works, HDMI may be officially limited to 60Hz, while a DVI double-link may work up to 144Hz), and to have a basic idea of how Windows’ screen settings work.

Buying a higher-hertz screen can shell you out of €150-€300 depending on your location of residence, but then you oftentimes successfully get what you paid for.

If you’re less than happy with throwing out your old screen, however, you can first of all try with your PC’s graphics control panels (Nvidia Control Panel or the Intel Graphics Control Panel). These have settings for custom resolutions, and these should work very well and easily for creating 75Hz resolutions.

For Nvidia, go to Nvidia Control Panel → Customise → accept the guarantee removal EULA (which is most of all there to assure themselves that you actually know what you’re doing) → Create Custom Resolution → and change the uppermost boxes to your native resolution and to a refresh of 75. Test it out with the Test button and see if it works.

nvidia-custom-resolution-thingies
How to make your screen faster in just three tabs.

Why you would want to try with 75Hz specifically, is because of how VGA monitors work. Almost all monitors that have VGA input sockets, will have to accomondate for VGA resolutions, which have traditionally been things like 800×600@75Hz. This also means that the monitor (or TV) is in fact physically capable of showing 75Hz.

If you however have either A) only a built-in laptop monitor, or B) no VGA plugs on your screen (which you don’t actually need to ever use), then this may simply not be something that would work on your screen.

Very similar settings exists in the Intel Graphics Control Panel, at least if you 1) actually have the Graphics Control Panel installed (You can usually install it yourself if you don’t have it), and 2) have it set to Advanced Mode.

 

#9 (Windows 10 only) Use a PIN code for your Microsoft account

A Microsoft account has been required in Windows 10 and 8 to make use of its many cloud abilities, although accounts can be applied individually to each app except for the synchronization of the system settings.

Microsoft accounts also tend to have password requirements. You need to have such and such amounts of mixed-case letters and numbers in it, and you need to write this at the very least as often as you boot up the PC.

There is a way to make the procedure smoother, though. In Windows 10’s November 2015 update, an option to set a PIN code popped up. This can be set to as little as 4 numbers, and have no mixed-case requirements. So if you are confident in your self-made PIN codes, you can cut the startup time to desktop by 1 second. Another factor is that you also don’t need to press Enter after typing in the PIN code either to log in, as you are logged in as soon as you hit the last correct digit.

If you use a local account with no login password requirements, and you do not have plans to add a Microsoft account to it, then this chapter can be skipped.

pinnie-thingies
It should show up in Windows 10’s settings as something like this. This is not clickable.

#10 Turn off startup programs that you don’t immediately need after starting up

This one is the most subjective of them all, since there probably aren’t any lists out there about which programs that delay your startup the most.

The rule of thumb, is that you need to go to the startup settings and turn off any programs that are neither needed immediately after startup, nor that need to run to detect various system components that you’d need in your daily PC use.

That leads us to another issue: Just where are the startup program settings? In Windows 10 and 8, they’re in Task Manager → Startup, while in Windows 7 they are in System Configuration → Startup.

Startup tool thingies.PNG
You probably never wanted “Send to OneNote” anyway. Or “DivX Update”.

Above is the configuration I’ve used on my main PC. Take note that the ones that are still activated, are those that are important for either system functions or to auto-detect oft-used things long after the system has booted.

Now it’s up to you to figure out the difference between vital and non-vital on your PC. For one time’s sake, I can’t give you any straight-up answers to this. You shall lead the course forward.

If you succeed, you can shave 3 or more seconds off the boot time, and make your system a fraction of a second faster during active use. If you did it wrong, you may notice that some components and drivers could fail to be detected properly, or that some background activities aren’t running.

#11 Don’t have a DVD in your disc reader while booting

This one is a pretty small advice, but it is one that it is easy to forget in a hurry.

Almost all Windows PCs have their BIOS treat their disc readers as boot options. This means that if you insert a DVD/Blu-Ray/CD with Windows or Linux installation tools, then your computer will make sure to go to the CD’s installation tool instead of to your harddisk’s existing installation.

However, to do that, the computer will need to start up the disc reader, begin to spin the reading laser around, read the disc’s content, and only then determine whether there are installation files on the DVD. This can add 5 or more seconds to the boot.

The thing is that it has to do that with all optical discs, even if the DVD is a bought movie you inserted for the movie night yesterday, a CD with sound driver tools, or your old ISO DVD with program tools you burned ages ago. If there is a disc in the disc reader, then your BIOS will fire up the reader and check the disc’s contents.

The most obvious way to prevent the content check from taking place, is to not have a DVD inside the drive. This means that each time you insert a DVD, you’ll have to take it out of the drive again before you turn it off.

Alternately, you can go into BIOS again and remove the disc drive as a boot option. You’ll likely need to do it both in the normal boot priority menu and in the DVD-only priority menu. This should solve the problem even if you’d still want to keep your DVDs in your readers for several days. Be aware that if you need to re-install Windows or boot a Linux Live DVD, you’ll need to re-enable the disc drive in the BIOS boot settings. The BIOS boot settings may or may not also be reset if you take in or out a harddisk from the PC.

#12 Don’t let your mechanical harddisks constantly go to sleep

This is something that many people would not admit to be experiencing, but some times, possibly several times each day, you try to open up a program or go into File Explorer and see that your PC has grinded to a complete standstill.

It’s not even sluggish at that point, it’s completely frozen except for the mouse cursor. And it remains like that for several seconds while you can hear the sound of something in your computer that is starting up.

Those things are your spinning mechanical harddisks. In order to use less electricity (maybe 5-10W less), and to reduce the wear and tear on the harddisks, Windows is typically set by default to automatically turn off mechanical harddisks after 10-30 minutes of not having been used for anything.

This would have been very nice, except for that in the very moment you invoke anything that is on the harddisk, the harddisk has to be turned on again. It will begin to spin itself around faster and faster, while your PC is completely frozen in motion while this goes on.

This is a setting in Windows’ battery settings. Go to Control Panel → Hardware and Sound → Power Options → your current power plan [Change plan settings] → Change Advanced Power Settings → Hard disk → Turn off hard disk after → and then raise the number a bit from its default.

power-plan-thingies

Setting it to somewhere between 30 and 60 minutes should be sufficient. Now the harddisk naps will hopefully become much more rare.

#X1 A summary of things you shouldn’t do to increase speed

There are many advices out there that tell you to turn off specific things to increase your Windows performance.  But sometimes the tips they give you, just aren’t worth it to use.

You should never turn off Windows stability features to increase the speed, regardless of whether they tell you to turn off Security Center, Windows Update, or your antivirus. Halting these do not actually carry any inherent speed boosts, and will instead make your PC a part of an evil botnet that will use some of your CPU every now and then, which in fact makes your PC slower.

Turning off Windows services in general is also a bad idea, unless any one of them is using 90% of your CPU. Many services that you are told to deactivate, are about such actually pretty important things as printers, multiple user logins, disk space notifications, or stability features.

You also should not delete the pagefile, because this is said to add 2 or more minutes to the shutdown time.


And there you have it! If you perform all of these 10 or more steps, then your PC will become fast as fuсk. You have my word on it.

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How to make your Windows PC fast as fuсk

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